Sage Wisdom From Rod Serling’s Planet of The Apes

Astronaut Colonel George Taylor: And that completes my final report until we reach touchdown. We’re now on full automatic in the hands of the computers. I’ve tucked my crew in for the long sleep, and I’ll be joining them…soon. In less than an hour we’ll finish our six months out of Cape Kennedy. Six months in deep space…by our time, that is. According to Dr. Hasslein’s theory of time in a vehicle traveling nearly the speed of light, the Earth has aged nearly 700 years since we left it…while we’ve aged hardly at all. Maybe so. This much is probably true. The men who sent us on this journey are long since dead and gone. You, who are reading me now, are a different breed…I hope a better one. I leave the 20th century with no regrets, but…one more thing, if anybody’s listening, that is. Nothing scientific. It’s…purely personal. But seen from out here, everything seems different. Time bends. Space is…boundless. It squashes a man’s ego. I feel lonely. That’s about it. Tell me, though, does man, that marvel of the universe, that glorious paradox who sent me to the stars, still make war against his brother…keep his neighbor’s children starving?
Planet of The Apes, 1968planet-of-the-apes-1968-01

Shane Rimmer dies at 89

The Spy Command

Shane Rimmer (1929-2019)

Shane Rimmer, a character actor who often played Americans in British-based productions and who appeared in three James Bond films, has died at 89.

His death was reported by the Official Gerry Anderson Website. Rimmer was a voice on Anderson-produced shows, including Thunderbirds. The website said his death was confirmed by his widow, Sheila Rimmer.

Shane Rimmer appeared in You Only Live Twice (1967), Diamonds Are Forever (1971) and The Spy Who Loved Me (1977). The latter provided the actor with his biggest 007 role, that of a U.S. submarine captain who assists Roger Moore’s James Bond.

Rimmer was born in Toronto. After moving to the U.K., he became a busy actor. Besides his work for Anderson and the Bond films, his credits included Dr. Strangelove, Superman II and various television shows, including The Persuaders!

In 2016, Rimmer did an interview where he reflected on working…

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The Guns of Navarone (1961)

Mike's Take On the Movies .......... Rediscovering Cinema's Past

Directed by J. Lee Thompson, this big budget extravaganza is the perfect example of a movie released early on to home video as the VHS tape was becoming a staple of home entertainment. It’s probably where I saw the film for the first time on a weekend rental from our local video store in the early 1980’s. Of course I’ve seen it countless times since then and while I don’t believe it to be a bona fide classic, it has much to offer in WW2 adventure and a cast of names to match. A cast that includes three Oscar winners with above the title billing.

Thompson would subsequently follow up this box office hit with the now classic, Cape Fear,  reteaming him with Navarone’s leading man, Gregory Peck. He’d also direct Peck twice more in The Chairman and Mackenna’s Gold before the end of the decade. Following that he’d…

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A peculiar Daniel Craig interview is published

The Spy Command

Daniel Craig

A peculiar interview with Daniel Craig was published online by Beyond magazine.

Why describe it as peculiar? In the text, it says, “Cameras began rolling on Bond 25 earlier this year.”

Bond 25 had an announced start date of March 4 — just six days ago. And that was before the release date was pushed back to April 2020 and it emerged that Scott Z. Burns was spending four weeks doing a rewrite of the script.

So what does “earlier this year” mean exactly? It’s hard to know reading the story.

Meanwhile, Craig appears to say that Bond 25 will really, really will be his finale.

“I have thoroughly enjoyed it,” Craig says in the interview.

It’s also clear that scribe Sarah Freeman is sympathetic to Craig. “On set, it’s now hard to imagine Bond being played by anyone else.”

Again, it makes it sound as if Craig…

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A fresh Mission to the Unknown filming

Sci-Fi Bulletin: Exploring the Universes of SF, Fantasy & Horror!

The classic Doctor Who story Mission to the Unknown is being remounted by students at UCLAN.

The news was confirmed by original series star Peter Purves, who is attending the shoot with Edward de Souza, who appeared in the episode back in 1965, and Nicholas Briggs, who will be voicing the Daleks. The single episode was a teaser for the 12 episode epic The Daleks Master Plan, and did not feature the Doctor (William Hartnell) or his companions.

Purves has noted that “it is being made as authentically as possible. The cameras are slightly later, but no zoom shots…

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Joseph Sirola, character actor and voice over artist, dies

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Joseph Sirola as U.S. spymaster Jonathan Kaye is about to spring a surprise on Steve McGarrett and let Wo Fat go in The Jinn Who Clears the Way,

Joseph Sirola, a character blessed with a voice that attracted much voice over work, has died at 89, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Sirola “died of complications from respiratory failure Sunday at a rehabilitation hospital in New York City,” according to the entertainment news website and trade publication.

The actor played villains in second-, third- and fourth-season episodes of The Man From U.N.C.L.E. He also portrayed U.S. spymaster Jonathan Kaye in five episodes of the original Hawaii Five-O series.

In his final appearance as Kaye, in The Jinn Who Clears the Way, his character springs a major surprise on Jack Lord’s Steve McGarrett. The Big Kahuna has captured arch villain Wo Fat. But Kaye makes the lawman let the…

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Logan’s Run: “Renew, renew…”

Musings of a Middle-Aged Geek

In the days before 1977’s “Star Wars” changed movies forever (at least for my generation), cinematic science fiction, with rare exceptions like “2001” and “Forbidden Planet,” consisted largely of cheapie monster flicks or dystopian nightmares.

One of the more successful of the dystopian movies was “Logan’s Run” (1976), based a bit loosely on a novel by sci-fi heavy hitters William F. Nolan and George Clayton Johnson (“Twilight Zone” “Star Trek TOS”). Nolan would go on to pen a couple of other adventures in this series, but I’ve only read the first book, so I’m not qualified to write about the sequels.

****SPOILERS!****

logans_run-644x1024“Can you identify this word?”

The original book was published in 1967, the famous ‘summer of love.’  It was a time when western culture was obsessed with youth, rebellion and the ever-increasing generation gap.   In this regard (and others) the book is quite different than the adaptations…

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